4 Tips to Foster a Love of Learning in Your Child

Many parents are concerned about getting their children to do homework, reading and writing and in general, enjoy school. Here are some tips you may want to use to foster a love of learning in your child (or teen). 1.Reading Foster reading by reading yourself. Read in front of your children, in a natural, non-imposing way. If they see you reading and enjoying it, they will most likely want to emulate you. The best way to encourage them to read is by not encouraging it at all, rather, role model the behaviour. 2. Electronic Devices Electronics are great, children love them, and at times they can be educational, or just plain entertaining. However, too much of a good thing can be harmful to your child. Monitor the amount of time your child spends playing with computer games, DS’s, PlayStation, XBOX etc… Give them a time range, for example, one hour playing time, with one hour intervals. It’s also important to monitor what games they are playing. Often, kids are left alone, playing or navigating the Internet. They may inadvertently download pornographic images, or even bugs (spyware) onto the computer. By periodically sitting by them and watching what they are doing, you show them that you care, and keeps them on track by playing only the games you approve.  3. Use Computers to Stimulate Encourage your child to interact with the computer for non-gaming purposes. Have them design their own birthday card, using a program such as Word or Publisher. Have them write a poem for a friend, or for you. Have them create their own calendar of events, or a calendar with their friend’s birthdays.  4. Pay Attention to Build Trust Some children may complain of feeling sick, without actually being ill, for example, say they’re having a stomach ache. Make time at night, around bed time to really talk to your children. Ask how they’re feeling; create open ended questions. Wait for an answer, without repeating yourself. Often children don’t answer these questions right away, or truthfully. Your silence and patience will indirectly encourage communication. If it doesn’t happen that night, don’t give up, keep trying. You may want to observe your child’s emotions by saying, “I think you’re feeling down.” Wait for a response, if your child begins to talk, listen carefully, don’t say too much. Let him or her find a solution to the problem. Having...
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